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Russian Armenian man also with Wagner Group leader Yevgeny … – NEWS.am

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Russian Armenian man also with Wagner Group leader Yevgeny …  NEWS.am

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Germany Adds Georgia and Moldova to List of Safe Countries of Origin – U.S. News & World Report

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Germany Adds Georgia and Moldova to List of Safe Countries of Origin  U.S. News & World Report

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Donald Trump Wants to Give His Favorite Corporations Another Giant Tax Cut in a Second Term: Report – Vanity Fair

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Donald Trump Wants to Give His Favorite Corporations Another Giant Tax Cut in a Second Term: Report  Vanity Fair

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Anatomy of Genocide: How the State Department Inadvertently Green-Lighted War on Armenians – The Armenian Mirror-Spectator

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The post Anatomy of Genocide: How the State Department Inadvertently Green-Lighted War on Armenians – The Armenian Mirror-Spectator first appeared on The News And Times Information Network – The News And Times.


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Russia says ruling party wins most votes in Ukrainian regions it occupies, while West calls elections sham

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Russia’s Central Election Commission said Monday that the country’s ruling party won the most votes in elections held in occupied Ukrainian regions, as Kyiv and the West denounced the ballots as a sham. The votes were held as Russian authorities attempt to tighten their grip on territories Moscow illegally annexed a year ago and still does not fully control.

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Experts to Biden Admin: ‘Wake Up’ To Avoid Second Armenian Genocide

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Leading human rights experts this week urged President Biden and other top U.S. officials to do more to stop the starvation of more than 120,000 ethnic Armenians or risk becoming complicit in a second genocide of this long-persecuted West Asian and mainly Christian population.

Rep. Chris Smith, a New Jersey Republican and longtime human rights champion, convened an emergency hearing Wednesday on the crisis in Nagorno-Karabakh, an enclave in the heart of a disputed territory in the South Caucasus. The region is internationally recognized as part of Azerbaijan, but Armenians have governed it since 1994. It was Smith’s second hearing on the topic in three months.

The Azerbaijani government has been trying to take control of the disputed region by force and last month completely blocked access to the Lachin corridor – the lone road from Armenia to Nagorno-Karabakh, sealing it off from any outside food, water, medicine, and fuel.

Media reports from the region show empty store shelves and women, children, and the elderly standing in long lines to buy food. Armenia’s Foreign Minister Ararat Mirzoyan said economic activity in the area has reached a standstill with tens of thousands of people unemployed. In addition, he has accused Azerbaijan of disrupting the electricity supply through the only high-voltage line between Armenia and Nagorno-Karabakh since Jan. 9.

During WWI, Armenians, who trace their Christian heritage back to the fourth century and the establishment of the Armenian Apostolic Church, were targeted by the Ottoman Empire and the Republic of Turkey for mass murder. Around 1 million Armenians were killed during death marches to the Syrian Desert, and others, primarily women and children, were forced to convert to Islam. On April 24, 2021, the Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day, President Joe Biden formally recognized the atrocities as genocide.

Now history could repeat itself despite Biden’s international obligations to prevent genocide, human rights experts warn. Luis Moreno Ocampo, former chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, on Wednesday testified that the situation is so dire in Nagorno-Karabakh that the blockade constitutes genocide under the Genocide Convention, an international treaty adopted by the United Nations in 1948.

“There is no doubt that genocide intentions are there,” said Ocampo, who issued a dire report on the humanitarian crises in early August. “It’s time to be stronger. We are sending this [warning] to the executive branch. Look, this is happening now. You have to know this.”

In Ocampo’s report, he calls starvation “the invisible genocide weapon” and warns that “without immediate dramatic change, this group of Armenians will be destroyed in a few weeks.”

“The U.S. should openly inform the Azerbaijan government that without the immediate and unconditional removal of the Lachin corridor blockade, the U.S. would consider Azerbaijan to be committing genocide,” Ocampo said at Wednesday’s hearing.

Smith, who co-chairs the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission, called the situation in Nagorno-Karabakh a “three-alarm fire” and pressed the Biden administration to declare the Lachin corridor blockade an act of genocide and take action to try to stop it through sanctions or other means. The government of Azerbaijan, led by President Ilham Aliyev, “planned, tested and imposed” this “crime of genocide,” Smith testified.

“Delay is denial,” Smith stated, noting that the U.S. State Department and the U.S. Agency for International Development did not respond to his invitation to testify at the hearing.

“The Biden administration must wake up, recognize the absolutely grave responsibility it has here, and focus on finding and implementing a humane solution,” Smith said. “And this must mean that the blockade is lifted, and the people continue to live in their ancient homeland — and not subject to violence and threats.”

State Department spokesman Vedant Patel earlier this week told reporters that the administration is “deeply concerned about the deteriorating humanitarian conditions in Nagorno-Karabakh resulting from the continued blockage of food, medicine and other essential goods.”

“The U.S. has worked continuously with the side over the past several weeks to allow humanitarian assistance to reach the population of Nagorno-Karabakh, and we reiterate our call to immediately reopen the Lachin corridor to humanitarian, commercial and passenger traffic,” Patel said.

A State Department spokesperson told RealClearPolitics that Secretary Antony Blinken has been personally engaged with the leaders of Armenia and Azerbaijan and spoke with Azerbaijani President Aliyev most recently on Sept. 1.

“Senior Advisor for Caucasus Negotiations Lou Bono has been in constant discussions with the leaders toward resolution of the humanitarian situation and of this long-standing conflict,” the spokesperson said. “And we are working, as always, bilaterally, with partners including the [European Union], and through multilateral organizations, toward resolution on all outstanding issues.

“We continue to urge the government of Azerbaijan to fully restore free transit of commercial, humanitarian, and passenger vehicles both in and out of the Lachin corridor expeditiously,” the spokesperson added.

The Azerbaijani government has defended the blockade as necessary to safeguard its sovereignty and security to prevent Armenia from using the route for “illegal military and other activities,” including rotating its 10,000 military personnel “illegally stationed” in Azerbaijani territory and transferring weapons and munitions, as well as unlawfully extracted natural resources.

Any genocide allegations are false, Aliyev maintains, arguing that his government has offered to supply food and goods through the town of Aghdam.

Yet, the International Committee of the Red Cross, the only international humanitarian body with access to the area, has been unable to get supplies into the region. The organization reported on July 25 that it had been unable to transport food through the Lachin corridor since June 15 and medicine since July 7.

Smith said USAID has not responded to his inquiries about when the agency last delivered into the region and cited reports that it was last delivered in 2020.

“This is a very significant signal – not a good one,” Smith argued. “The president of the Azerbaijan government is testing the will of the U.S. government. The [Biden administration] having failed so many tests, it will now be difficult to reverse.”

Members of the European Union Parliament also are pressing for immediate action. Armenia and Azerbaijan have fought two wars over the disputed territory, and Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan has warned that a new war is likely if the blockade continues. Nagorno-Karabakh’s separatist government views the blockade as a violation of the Moscow-brokered 2020 ceasefire agreement that placed the 5-kilometer-wide strip of land under the control of Russian peacekeepers.

David Phillips, the director of Columbia University’s Artsakh Atrocities Project, also testified during Wednesday’s congressional hearing, pressing the State Department to impose severe sanctions against Azerbaijani individuals responsible for the “atrocities” in Nagorno-Karabakh.

“The international community failed to sanction individuals who committed crimes after the war in 2016 and 2020,” said Phillips, who provided a list of perpetrators. “Its failure sent a message to the Government of Azerbaijan that it can act with impunity and escape repercussions for its crimes against humanity, ethnic cleansing, and acts of genocide.”

Smith, who chaired a hearing on the same topic two months ago in June, argued that the situation is much more desperate now.  

“Two-and-a-half more months of inaction raises the question whether there is, within our own government, any will to help,” he said.

In August, when the United Nations Security Council met in a special session to discuss the crisis, neither the U.S. nor any other member took action to refer this matter to the International Criminal Court. The Security Council did not issue a statement, but U.S. Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield, who chaired the meeting, told the Associated Press afterward that “there were strong statements in the council from everyone that the Lachin Corridor needed to be reopened.”

“That was the main accomplishment” of the meeting, she said.

A State Department spokesperson told RCP that Thomas-Greenfield “underscored the need for the immediate resumption of humanitarian, private, and commercial traffic along the Lachin corridor while acknowledging the deepening humanitarian impact on residents of Nagorno-Karabakh as a result of Azerbaijan’s continued blockage.”

Thomas-Greenfield also highlighted the need for continued dialogue and the possibility of compromise on additional routes for humanitarian supplies. 

“We will continue to engage on this matter as appropriate and work constructively with fellow [Security Council] member states,” the spokesperson said.

Human rights activists argue that time is running out to stop the mass starvation. The Azerbaijani government is responding to this inaction with growing impunity, Smith warned.

President Aliyev recently justified the blockade by arguing it’s necessary to deal with attempts by humanitarian aid organizations, including the Red Cross, to smuggle in cigarettes, iPhones, and gasoline. Azerbaijan’s ambassador to the United Nations refuted allegations of genocide and held up photos of purported Karabakh residents celebrating weddings and birthdays, what Smith said the Azerbaijani government was falsely trying to depict as “partying and enjoying the high life.”

The Biden administration has dismissed Aliyev’s claims and urges the government to “fully restore free transit of commercial, humanitarian, and passenger vehicles both in and out of the Lachin corridor expeditiously.”

“The United States is deeply concerned about the deteriorating humanitarian conditions in Nagorno-Karabakh resulting from the continued blockage of food, medicine, and other essential goods,” the State Department spokesperson told RCP. “Access to food, medicine, baby formula, and energy should never be held hostage.”


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REVEALED: Retired doctor, 69, who was busted with guns, drugs and prostitutes on his yacht in Nantucket has te – Daily Mail

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REVEALED: Retired doctor, 69, who was busted with guns, drugs and prostitutes on his yacht in Nantucket has te  Daily Mail

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Georgian Prime Minister expresses readiness to contribute to regional peace and stability

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Georgian Prime Minister expresses readiness to contribute to regional peace and stability
16:30, 9 September 2023

YEREVAN, SEPTEMBER 9, ARMENPRESS. Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan spoke by phone on Saturday with his Georgian counterpart Irakli Garibashvili to discuss issues related to the current situation in the region, the Prime Minister’s Office reported.

PM Pashinyan and PM Garibashvili discussed the worsening humanitarian crisis in Nagorno-Karabakh due to the illegal blocking of the Lachin Corridor, the accumulation of Azerbaijani troops around Nagorno-Karabakh, and the increase in tension on the Armenia-Azerbaijan state border, the Prime Minister’s Office said in a readout.

“Prime Minister Pashinyan emphasized his commitment to the Prague agreements of October 6, 2022 and Brussels agreements of May 14, 2023, as well as to the approaches to solving all issues exclusively through diplomatic means and in a constructive atmosphere.

The Prime Minister of Georgia stated that he is ready to make necessary efforts to promote peace and stability in the region.

The sides emphasized the settlement of existing problems through peaceful negotiations.

PM Nikol Pashinyan reaffirmed that he is ready to have urgent discussions with the President of Azerbaijan,” the Prime Minister’s Office added.


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Armenia holds drills with US amid rift with Russia

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Yerevan (AFP) – The United States and Armenia opened military drills on Monday, the latest sign of Yerevan drifting from Moscow’s orbit as Russia’s invasion of Ukraine reshapes post-Soviet relations.

Soldiers walk in a trench at a border checkpoint between Armenia and Azerbaijan near the village of Sotk, Armenia, on June 18, 2021
Soldiers walk in a trench at a border checkpoint between Armenia and Azerbaijan near the village of Sotk, Armenia, on June 18, 2021 © Karen MINASYAN / AFP/File

The exercises come amid mounting frustration in Armenia over what it sees as Russia’s failure to act as a security guarantor amid mounting tensions with its historic rival Azerbaijan.

Exercise Eagle Partner opened with some 85 US soldiers to train around 175 Armenian soldiers through September 20, according to the US Army Europe and Africa Command.

Armenia’s defence ministry said the exercises aimed to “increase the level of interoperability” with US forces in international peacekeeping missions.

The US military said the drills would help Armenia’s 12th Peacekeeping Brigade meet NATO standards ahead of an evaluation later this year.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Armenia’s decision not to conduct drills with the Moscow-led Collective Security Treaty Organisation (CSTO) alliance and instead work with the United States required “very deep analysis”.

“Of course, we will try to comprehend and understand all this. But in any case we will do so in close partnership dialogue with the Armenian side,” he said.

The United States brushed off the Kremlin critique and pointed to Russia’s wars with both Ukraine and Georgia.

“I think that given Russia has invaded two of its neighbours in recent years, it should refrain from lecturing countries in the region about security arrangements,” State Department spokesman Matthew Miller told reporters.

He said that the United States has had security cooperation with Armenia since 2003 and called the latest drill “a routine exercise that is in no way tied to any other events.”

But Moscow last week summoned Armenia’s ambassador to complain about “unfriendly steps” the country was taking.

The ministry said Armenia’s envoy was given a “tough” rebuke but insisted that the countries “remain allies.”

“It sounded more like a threat to Yerevan than a description of reality,” said Gela Vasadze, an independent political analyst.

“In fact, Russian-Armenian relations have reached a strategic impasse,” he told AFP.

‘Weakened Russia’

In Yerevan, residents expressed frustration over Russia’s lack of military and political support as tensions with Azerbaijan flared again.

Mariam Anahamyan, 27, told AFP that Armenia had made a mistake by “pinning its hopes on the Russians”.

“So now let’s try with the Americans. The consequences may be bad but not trying would be even worse,” she said.

For Arthur Khachaduryan, a 51-year-old security guard, “Russia failed to keep its commitments during the war and has even made our situation worse.”

He was referring to a brief but bloody conflict in 2020 for control of Nagorno-Karabakh, a separatist region in Azerbaijan.

Russia brokered a ceasefire and deployed 2,000 peacekeepers to the Lachin corridor, which connects Armenia to Nagorno-Karabakh.

But Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan recently said Moscow was either “unable or unwilling” to control the passage.

His government has accused Azerbaijan of closing the road and blockaded the mountainous region, spurring a humanitarian crisis in Armenian-populated towns.

Pashinyan also recently claimed that Armenia’s historic security reliance on Russia was a “strategic mistake”.

Bogged down in its invasion and isolated on the world stage, “weakened Russia is rapidly losing influence in its Soviet-era backyard”, said independent analyst Arkady Dubnov.

“Armenians are frustrated with Russia, which failed to help them during the Karabakh war and its aftermath,” he said, adding that Moscow “also seems to be lacking a clear plan, strategy in the Caucasus”.

‘New allies’

Nagorno-Karabakh was at the centre of two wars between Azerbaijan and Armenia.

In the 1990s, Armenia defeated Azerbaijan and took control of the region, along with seven adjacent districts of Azerbaijan.

Thirty years later, energy-rich Azerbaijan, which built a strong military and secured the backing from Turkey, took revenge.

After the 2020 war, Yerevan was forced to cede several territories it had controlled for decades.

The situation in Nagorno-Karabakh remains volatile and Armenia has accused Azerbaijan of moving troops near the region recently, raising the spectre of a fresh large-scale conflict.

The European Union and United States have taken a lead role in mediating peace talks but have so far failed to bring about a breakthrough.

“The Kremlin has no resources — neither the will — to help Armenia and is letting Azerbaijan and Turkey to pursue their objectives,” Dubnov said.

“In that situation, Armenia is trying to forge strong new alliances.”

© 2023 AFP


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Georgian Prime Minister expresses readiness to contribute to regional peace and stability – ARMENPRESS

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Georgian Prime Minister expresses readiness to contribute to regional peace and stability  ARMENPRESS

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